BGS people – Caroline Graham, a rock star physicist

For two weeks at the beginning of July I got the opportunity to meet a whole bunch of interesting people at the British Geological Survey and speak with them about what they do, why they enjoy it and why it’s interesting. It’s been a great opportunity for me to geek out at all the amazing things the BGS is doing and the brilliant people who work there.

Dr Caroline Graham is described at the BGS as the ‘rock star physicist’, only better than the other one because she has actual rocks! She spends her time studying geomechanics – which is how rocks behave under pressure and how they break apart – she has even listened to the sounds that rocks make as they fracture and discovered that some rocks make a specific sound just before they break!! Now she spends her time examining critical rock resources like those we may use to dispose of radioactive waste or store carbon. You can read the post here.

Dr Caroline Graham working in a salt mine.

Dr Caroline Graham working in a salt mine.

 

 

Advertisements

BGS people – Tim Kearsey, a curious sedimentologist

For two weeks at the beginning of July I got the opportunity to meet a whole bunch of interesting people at the British Geological Survey and speak with them about what they do, why they enjoy it and why it’s interesting. It’s been a great opportunity for me to geek out at all the amazing things the BGS is doing and the brilliant people who work there.

Dr Tim Kearsey used to be a PhD student at Plymouth University and now spends his time investigating Tetrapods, examining uncertainty in 3D models and exploring the sedimentology of many countries around the world. You can read the post here.

Dr Tim Kearsey examining sedimentary cores

Dr Tim Kearsey examining sedimentary cores

BGS people – Keith Ambrose, a geology champion

For two weeks at the beginning of July I got the opportunity to meet a whole bunch of interesting people at the British Geological Survey and speak with them about what they do, why they enjoy it and why it’s interesting. It’s been a great opportunity for me to geek out at all the amazing things the BGS is doing and the brilliant people who work there.

Here is the fourth post on the inspiring Keith Ambrose. Keith has worked for the BGS for nearly 40 years and along the way has become a leading advocate for preserving our geological heritage. Check out the post here.

Now that's a geology desk - maps and rocks everywhere!

Now that’s a geology desk – maps and rocks everywhere!